Workshops

Do you want to be a crime writer? At the Noirwich Crime Writing Festival you can learn from the best in our friendly workshops on Friday 15 September.

Taking place on campus at the University of East Anglia, there are morning and afternoon sessions available.

DON’T MISS: The workshops are followed in the evening by a great double-bill and exhibition at UEA featuring Martina Cole and Arne Dahl.

Special offer:
Save £10 and book both workshops with a combined ticket for £80


Character and Motivation with Laura Wilson & Melanie McGrath

£45
Friday 15 September, 11am-1pm or 2pm-4pm
The Enterprise Centre, University of East Anglia

Book a place on the workshop

Using exercises and photographic prompts, we will explore ways of creating credible protagonists and antagonists, as well as how to avoid stereotypes and how to ensure that your characters have sufficient and plausible motivation for their actions.

About Laura

Laura Wilson is the author of thirteen psychological crime novels, two of which were shortlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger. Her novel The Lover won the Prix du Polar Européen, and Stratton’s War won the Ellis Peters Award. She is the Guardian’s crime fiction reviewer and lectures on the subject at City University. Her latest book is The Other Womanwww.laura-wilson.co.uk

About Melanie

Melanie McGrath is an Essex girl, cofounder of Killer Women, and an award-winning writer of fiction and nonfiction. She has been twice longlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger and picked as Times and Financial Times thrillers of the year.

She has written for The Guardian, The Observer, The Daily Telegraph, The Observer, The Mail on Sunday and The Wall Street Journal and has taught creative writing at Arvon and at UEA, Roehampton, City Universities in the UK and the University of North Carolina. She won the John Llewellyn-Rhys-Mail on Sunday award for Best British writer under 35 for her first book, Motel Nirvana.

Writing a police procedural in the 21st century with Stav Sherez

£45
Friday 15 September, 11am-1pm or 2pm-4pm
The Enterprise Centre, University of East Anglia

Book a place on the workshop

Do you want to create the new Rebus or Bosch? Police procedurals account for some of the most iconic, enduring and successful novels in the genre but what does it take to write a procedural in the 21st century? The internet has changed crime, as each newly-revealed hack makes us all too aware – but it has also fundamentally changed policing. We’ve gone from hunches and shoe leather to data mining and screen scanning and the modern-day police procedural must follow in these footsteps.

Looking at the structure of the police procedural, we’ll examine what it is that makes it such a popular and perennial sub-genre as well as going into the pros and cons of choosing to write one. We’ll walk through the main elements necessary for the creation of a realistic procedural, then ask whether realism is as important as it’s perceived to be. In the second half of the class, we’ll chart the evolution of the police procedural and how modern electronic detection has changed the form and, finally, ask how do we breathe new life into the police procedural?

About Stav

Stav Sherez is the author of five novels. The Devil’s Playground (2004), his debut, was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasy Dagger Award. His second novel was The Black Monastery (2009). A Dark Redemption (2012, Shortlisted for the Theakston’s Old Pecuiler Crime Novel of the Year) was the first of the Carrigan & Miller series, followed by Eleven Days (2013, also shortlisted for the Theakston’s Old Pecuiler Crime Novel of the Year) and The Intrusions (2017). You can find him on twitter @stavsherez.


Special offer:
Save £10 and book both workshops with a combined ticket for £80